Falling Forward - A Portfolio of Nine Prints by Mauro Altamura

PortfolioOverview.jpg
Falling-Forward.jpg
Reggie-Monster.jpg
Windmill-Runner.jpg
Against-The-Wall.jpg
Ghost-Man-Throwing-Ball.jpg
Rain-Delay.jpg
Sweet-Lou.jpg
Ascending-To-Heaven.jpg
Two-Angels-Dancing.jpg
PortfolioOverview.jpg
Falling-Forward.jpg
Reggie-Monster.jpg
Windmill-Runner.jpg
Against-The-Wall.jpg
Ghost-Man-Throwing-Ball.jpg
Rain-Delay.jpg
Sweet-Lou.jpg
Ascending-To-Heaven.jpg
Two-Angels-Dancing.jpg

Falling Forward - A Portfolio of Nine Prints by Mauro Altamura

6,500.00

The Falling Foward Portfolio by Mauro Altamura is the complete set of archival pigment images that are 10” wide and centered on 11” x 14” satin finished paper. The images can be displayed as a box set or the images can be framed.

Individual prints are also available in three sizes, please contact gallery for pricing.
16” x 20”
20” x 24”
30” x 40”

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The Fielder’s Choice

By James Ruggia

The beauty of peripheral vision begins with the fact that it exists outside the perimeters of choice. Under ordinary circumstances, we follow our curiosity as it directs us toward what it finds most interesting in a particular moment, leaving a blurry wake in the path through what our focus finds unworthy of its attention. Mauro Altamura’s photography chooses this unchosen landscape that lies in the blurry periphery and somehow finds a raw human experience that touches us more intimately than what we normally sanctify as chosen images. These oddly intimate photos touch us in a place even nearer than identity. Choice, a function of identity, obscures that nearest of places, wherein our most essential selves dwell beneath name and memory. 

Knowing the names and the teams of the ballplayers in these photos is about as relevant as knowing the name or the cause of the man that Robert Capa caught in the moment of his death in his famous ‘Falling Soldier’ photo from the Spanish Civil War. As he drops his gun on the battlefield, Capa’s soldier is forcibly reunited with his humanity. In Altamura’s ballpark we see the men inside the players, the desperation inside the competition. We can hear through the mind’s ear, the lonely sound of the figure gasping as he scrambles in the infield dirt for the ball.